Indictment targets Trussville Entertainment District properties

A recent federal indictment links nine Trussville Entertainment District properties to a massive tax evasion scheme. , Timothy Pughsley, faces 38 total charges in the case. He also owns 30% of Downtown Trussville LLC, which developed the entertainment district. In addition to various bank accounts linked to the defendants, prosecutors also described a total of 30 properties that they may try to seize as punishment. Of these, nine are parcels of the Trussville Entertainment District, which currently houses shops and restaurants. The city of Trussville invested nearly $20 million of its own money in the project. “It’s paid off. Not just for this area, but for our entire downtown area and others. A number of new businesses have come here because they see what Trussville has done to move from forward,” said Mayor Buddy Choat. was advised by the developer’s attorney, Jay Smith, that the venue should be suitable. “I’m confident we’re going to have open businesses, and we’re going to move forward with what we had planned for this area,” Choat said. Retired federal judge John Carroll said several steps must be taken before property can be seized in criminal forfeiture. First, Pughsley should be convicted and prosecutors should prove that illegal proceeds were spent on the properties or plots. were used to commit the crime. Carroll said the law protects the primary owner in cases like this. “Where innocent buyers can come to court and say, ‘Wait a minute, we didn’t know anything about that. It was a mistake to confiscate the property, we shouldn’t have to lose our property,'” Carroll said. Smith said Pughsley was a passive investor in the project and the developer knew nothing of the crimes he is charged with.” We do not believe the indictment or charges will have any effect on the development of the center- town of Trussville, or the businesses that operate there,” Jay Smith said. Pughsley and nine of the other defendants will be in federal court for arraignment Thursday morning.

A recent federal indictment links nine Trussville Entertainment District properties to a massive tax evasion scheme.

The 56-page complaint accuses 11 people of conspiring to avoid paying nearly $20 million in federal excise taxes on a lucrative sports betting operation called Red44.

The main defendant, Timothy Pughsley, faces a total of 38 charges in this case.

He also owns 30% of Downtown Trussville LLC, which developed the entertainment district.

In addition to various bank accounts linked to the defendants, prosecutors also described a total of 30 properties that they may attempt to seize as punishment.

Of these, nine are parcels of the Trussville Entertainment District, which currently houses shops and restaurants.

The city of Trussville invested nearly $20 million of its own money in the project.

“It’s paid off. Not just for this area, but for our entire downtown area and others. A number of new businesses have come here because they see what Trussville has done to move from forward,” said Mayor Buddy Choat.

Choat was advised by the developer’s attorney, Jay Smith, that the venue should be suitable.

“I’m confident we’re going to have businesses open and we’re going to move forward with what we had planned for this region,” Choat said.

Retired federal judge John Carroll said several steps must be taken before property can be seized in criminal forfeiture.

First, Pughsley should be convicted and prosecutors should prove that illegal proceeds were spent on the properties or the plots were used to commit the crime.

Carroll said the law protects the primary owner in cases like this.

“Where innocent buyers can come to court and say, ‘Wait a minute, we didn’t know anything about that. It was a mistake to confiscate the property, we shouldn’t have to lose our property,” Carroll said.

Smith said Pughsley was a passive investor in the project and the developer knew nothing of the crimes he is accused of.

“We do not believe the indictment or charges will have an effect on the development of downtown Trussville or the businesses that operate there,” Jay Smith said.

Pughsley and nine of the other defendants will be in federal court for arraignment Thursday morning.

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